Wellington.Scoop » NZIFF announces premieres of new New Zealand feature films

Press release – New Zealand International Film Festival
Whanau Mārama: New Zealand International Film Festival (NZIFF) today unveils its selection of impressive New Zealand feature films that have been selected to screen at the 2022 festival so far. Rich in storytelling, themes of resilience, survival and hope run deep in many titles.

The NZIFF opens in Wellington on Thursday August 4th.

Nina Nawalowalo makes her feature film directorial debut with A Boy Called Piano – The Story of Fa’amoana John Luafutuand Welby Ings with Punch.

Adapted from stage to screen, A boy named piano is an incredibly moving documentary detailing the remarkable story of Fa’amoana’s time as a ward of the state in the 1960s and the intergenerational impacts of these experiences. The film recently received the award for Best Documentary Feature at the Montreal Independent Film Festival.

Punchshot against the black sands of the west coast beaches of Tāmaki Makaurau, has its world premiere at NZIFF 2022. This contemporary coming-of-age story is set in a small New Zealand town and stars Tim Roth , Oscar nominee, and newcomers Jordan Oosterhof and Conan Hayes.

Veteran of the independent documentary Costa Botes (Forgot money, act of kindness, Angie) returns to the festival with the world premiere of the observational documentary When the cows come home, chronicling the unusual life of musician, journalist, artist and cow whisperer, Andrew Johnstone. Interviewing Johnstone, his family and friends involved in the various phases of Johnstone’s evolution, it seems that Botes, himself a one-man production company, has found a kindred spirit in this quirky bohemian.

Also making its world premiere at the festival is Geoff Dixon – Portraits of us filmmakers Glenis Giles and Clare O’Leary. The film is an intimate dive into the world of New Zealand-born Australian visual artist Geoff Dixon, whose work confronts the fragility of the natural world and seeks to raise awareness of the issues of climate change and endangered species.

Anthology films Kainga and We are always here will offer audiences the immense talents of a pool of filmmakers, bringing together a group of Pan-Asian and Indigenous filmmakers respectively.

The final film in the trilogy which includes critically acclaimed films Waru (NZIFF 2017) and go (2019), Kainga features stories written and directed by 11 Pan-Asian Kiwi filmmakers of Maori Chinese descent from Aotearoa, China, Philippines, India, Iran, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Myanmar and Tamil Eelam which chronicle the diverse and ever-changing experiences of Asians trying to make Aotearoa New Zealand their home.

Conceived as a cinematic response to the 250th anniversary of James Cook’s arrival in the South Pacific, We are always here intertwines eight stories from 10 New Zealand, Australian and South Pacific filmmakers who span 1000 years, past, present and future. The films explore stories of kinship, loss, grief and resilience and show the strength of love and hope in overcoming the shared trauma that First Nations peoples continue to face.

“We are always proud to showcase local cinema at the festival and it is an honor to share this world-class Kiwi programming with Aotearoa audiences this winter,” said NZIFF Chief Executive Sally Woodfield.

“We encourage New Zealanders to experience these beautifully crafted films on the big screen and support local filmmakers.”

Further New Zealand feature films will be announced when the full festival program is unveiled in July.

Aotearoa New Zealand films screened at NZIFF 2022 are proudly supported by Resene.

New Zealand films showing at NZIFF 2022 so far:

New Zealand premiere: A boy named piano The Story of Fa’amoana John Luafutu
Dir: Nina Nawalowalo

A Boy Called Piano – The Story of Fa’amoana John Luafutu tells the remarkable story of Fa’amoana’s time as a ward of the state in the 1960s and the intergenerational impacts of those experiences. The result of a long-term collaboration with the Luafutu Aiga, the film blends dramatized sequences and powerful interviews with beautiful aerial and underwater photography, bringing Nina Nawalowalo’s famous visual storytelling to the screen for the first time.

To learn more, click here

World Premiere: Geoff Dixon: Portraits of Us
Dir: Glenis Giles and Clare O’Leary

From filmmakers Glenis Giles and Clare O’Leary comes a documentary Geoff Dixon – Portraits of usan intimate dive into the world of Australia-based New Zealand visual artist Geoff Dixon whose work confronts the fragility of the natural world and seeks to raise awareness of the issues of climate change and endangered species.

To learn more, click here

World Premiere: Kainga
Dir: Michelle Ang, Ghazaleh Golbakhsh, HASH, Nahyeon Lee, Angeline Loo, Asuka Sylvie, Yamin Tun, Julie Zhu

Following the success of Waru (NZIFF 2017) and go (2019), the trilogy is completed with Kainga, featuring 11 pan-Asian filmmakers who create unique stories chronicling the diverse and ever-changing experiences of Asians trying to make Aotearoa, New Zealand their home. The stories, which take place in the same house for several decades, explore the historical connection with tangata whenua, feelings of isolation, community support instead of family, precariousness at home, enthusiasm at work. idea of ​​going home, the desire to be “back home”, to be home-altered, and finally to claim home.

To learn more, click here

World Premiere: Punch
Dir: Welby Ings

A contemporary film about love, loyalty and liberation, Punch centers on Jim, a teenage boxer in a small town. He is a golden boy, preparing for a fight that will elevate him to early professional status. His father Stan, a demanding coach and notorious alcoholic, gave everything to see his son escape the brutality of his little world. As Jim begins to rethink why he fights, his life becomes entangled with Whetu, an outcast Maori takatāpui classmate. In a world that claims being gay is accepted, this film peels back the veneer of tolerance to show what lies beneath the surface. As Jim stumbles to find out what it’s really like to be a gay man, he’s forced to see that strength has little to do with heroism.

To learn more, click here

New Zealand premiere: We are always here
Dir: Beck Cole, Danielle MacLean, Dena Curtis, Tim Worrall, Richard Curtis, Miki Magasiva, Mario Gaoa, Chantelle Burgoyne, Tracey Rigney, Renae Maihi

We are always here is a unique Indigenous film that blends eight powerful stories from 10 Australian, New Zealand and South Pacific directors. Conceived as a cinematic response to the 250th anniversary of James Cook’s arrival in this region, We are always here travels through 1000 years of past, present and future, exploring stories of kinship, loss, grief and resilience and showing the strength of love and hope in overcoming the common traumas faced by Indigenous peoples of Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific continued to face .

To learn more, click here

World Premiere: When the cows come home
Dir: Costa Botes

Veteran Wellington documentary maker Costa Botes returns with an observational documentary chronicling the unusual life of musician, journalist, artist and cow whisperer Andrew Johnstone. Opening on the Johnstone family farm in Cambridge, When the cows come home, Johnstone is eager to share his views on cattle breeding and communication, before the film takes us back through the events that shaped the farmer-philosopher – from personal family tragedy to the war with Catholic school authorities, to innovating in Hamilton’s nascent music scene to create guerrilla art installations; Johnstone’s life has had a truly idiosyncratic trajectory. Mental health issues may have seen him retreat into life on the farm, but the film makes it clear that his subject’s restless curiosity is far from being put to pasture.

To learn more, click here

Content from scoop.co.nz
original url

Comments are closed.