Filmmaking fund – Taking Sides http://taking-sides.com/ Sat, 23 Oct 2021 22:11:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://taking-sides.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-26-120x120.png Filmmaking fund – Taking Sides http://taking-sides.com/ 32 32 Texas governor signs heartbeat bill banning abortions in past six weeks https://taking-sides.com/texas-governor-signs-heartbeat-bill-banning-abortions-in-past-six-weeks/ https://taking-sides.com/texas-governor-signs-heartbeat-bill-banning-abortions-in-past-six-weeks/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 22:57:06 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/texas-governor-signs-heartbeat-bill-banning-abortions-in-past-six-weeks/ Texas Governor Greg Abbott on Wednesday signed a law that would ban abortions as early as six weeks and allow almost any private citizen the right to sue abortion providers. “Our creator gave us the right to life and yet millions of children lose their right to life every year because of abortion,” Abbott said. […]]]>

Texas Governor Greg Abbott on Wednesday signed a law that would ban abortions as early as six weeks and allow almost any private citizen the right to sue abortion providers.

“Our creator gave us the right to life and yet millions of children lose their right to life every year because of abortion,” Abbott said. noted. “[The Texas Legislature] worked together on a bipartisan basis to pass a bill I’m about to sign that ensures the life of every unborn child who has a heartbeat will be saved from the ravages of abortion.

The bill bans abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detected, including cases where the woman has become pregnant as a result of rape or incest. There is an exception for certain medical emergencies.

The Texas Heartbeat Bill is similar to bills from other states that have gone to court, but this bill has a different element. The bill gives individuals, not government, the ability to enforce the law. Texans can sue abortion providers or anyone who helps someone get an abortion. The citizen would not need to be related to the provider or the person having the abortion in order to take legal action.

Supporters of the bill believe it is the first of many steps that must be taken to end abortions.

“Texas Right to Life reminds our elected officials of their solemn duty to protect the lives of their citizens, especially the most vulnerable and innocent Texans in the womb. The signing of the Texas Heartbeat Act marks a historic milestone in the battle to protect life, ”said organization.

See also


However, abortion rights advocates have already said they are preparing to challenge the new law. According to these advocates, the six-week delay is too extreme, as many women do not even know they are pregnant at the time. This law is said to be one of the most extreme abortion laws in the United States and the strictest in Texas since Roe v. Wade.

The Texas law follows a historic week for abortion laws. Earlier this week, the U.S. Supreme Court said it would consider a Mississippi law that would ban most abortions after 15 weeks. The Court’s decision could potentially overturning the Roe v. Wade.

Texas law comes into effect in September.

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Marinette Higher Education Coalition celebrates Stephen Jensen, graduate https://taking-sides.com/marinette-higher-education-coalition-celebrates-stephen-jensen-graduate/ https://taking-sides.com/marinette-higher-education-coalition-celebrates-stephen-jensen-graduate/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 22:57:06 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/marinette-higher-education-coalition-celebrates-stephen-jensen-graduate/ army reservist. Veteran. Philosopher. EMT. Firefighter. Major in psychology. Taekwondo black belt. Stephen Jensen can claim all these titles. Today Jensen works as a civilian state employee for the 128e Air Refueling Wing of the Air National Guard, where he specializes in fire rescue. Graduating from Menominee High School in 2004, Jensen continued his education […]]]>

army reservist. Veteran. Philosopher. EMT. Firefighter. Major in psychology. Taekwondo black belt. Stephen Jensen can claim all these titles.

Today Jensen works as a civilian state employee for the 128e Air Refueling Wing of the Air National Guard, where he specializes in fire rescue.

Graduating from Menominee High School in 2004, Jensen continued his education at UW-Marinette (now UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus), unsure of where his life would go. “Even though I wasn’t the best student in high school, UW-Marinette was a great place to start my college experience. I can’t tell you how many times I went to see the writing or math teacher, but I grew up because of it. I fell in love with learning just for the fun of it, and was able to achieve goals that I didn’t know I was capable of. I never dreamed that I would be a student on the Dean’s List, but I was.

Stephen jensen

After earning an associate’s degree in arts and science from UW-Marinette, he studied philosophy and psychology and completed his bachelor’s degree at Northern Michigan University. He then spent a semester at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College as part of the Emergency Medical Technician program. “The NWTC EMT instructors were very down to earth, real world oriented. I appreciate the way they share their own experience with us and instill confidence in their students.

He spent some time at a fire academy in Detroit, then, Jensen says, “I came to realize that, as Plato suggested, philosophers should be warriors too, so I joined the army reserve. I was a top graduate in my fire academy class at the Goodfellow Air Base Department of Defense and eventually deployed to Kuwait and Afghanistan.

Back in the United States, Jensen realized that “fighting fires was a career that I could imagine for myself in the long run.”

Through all of his educational experiences, Jensen says he learned the value of dedication and hard work, spending long nights in the library, even until it closed. “It was great to see this hard work pay off. “

Stephen Jensen on the pumper

Jensen says he’s happy he started locally for college, as it offered smaller classes and more one-on-one time with instructors who cared about him and his success. Plus, he was able to work at a local manufacturing plant to pay for school fees and books. “Going to a local university and technical college was worth it for a lot of reasons, but also because I don’t owe a dime in student loans,” Jensen added.

What advice does he have for new students? “Sit in the front row. Prepare your lunch and show up early. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Don’t be afraid to go during office hours or see tutors. If you want to be successful, go against the grain, ”Jensen said.

NWTC Marinette and UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus applaud the great work Jensen has done and continues to do for his community. He is one of the many students that institutions are proud to call alumni.

The Coalition for Higher Education in the Marinette region is a collaboration between NWTC Marinette and UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus, designed to provide a seamless student experience and higher education accessible to anyone living in the Marinette area. Individuals enrolled in either college have the unique opportunity to access the resources and services of either campus as well as transfer certain degrees from NWTC Marinette to UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus . Visit nwtc.edu/Coalition and uwgb.edu/Coalition for more information on the coalition and its collaborations.

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Pennsylvania Poll Question: Should Paid Fire Departments Get State Loans? https://taking-sides.com/pennsylvania-poll-question-should-paid-fire-departments-get-state-loans/ https://taking-sides.com/pennsylvania-poll-question-should-paid-fire-departments-get-state-loans/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 22:57:06 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/pennsylvania-poll-question-should-paid-fire-departments-get-state-loans/ If voters approve, this polling initiative will allow towns and villages with paid firefighters to tap into an existing public fund. Mark Henninger / Imagic Digital ?? Do you like Philly? Sign up for Billy Penn’s free newsletter to learn everything you need to know about Philadelphia, every day. In an election in Pennsylvania, there […]]]>

If voters approve, this polling initiative will allow towns and villages with paid firefighters to tap into an existing public fund.

Mark Henninger / Imagic Digital

billypenn-voterguide-sm

?? Do you like Philly? Sign up for Billy Penn’s free newsletter to learn everything you need to know about Philadelphia, every day.


In an election in Pennsylvania, there is usually at least one polling question about government spending or a bureaucratic process that is sure to make your eyes shine on first reading.

For the May 2021 primary, there is a statewide referendum titled “Making Municipal Fire and Emergency Medical Services Eligible for Loans.”

The question of the ballot is long and serpentine. But it’s important: your vote could have an impact on the continued existence of fire stations and ambulances across the Commonwealth.

What you will see on the ballot

Do you support expanding the use of referendum-authorized debt for loans to volunteer firefighters, volunteer ambulance services, and volunteer rescue teams under 35 PA.CS §7378.1 (linked to referendum for over-indebtedness) to include loans to municipal fire departments or companies providing services through paid staff and emergency medical service companies for the purpose of establishing and upgrading facilities to house fire fighting equipment. apparatus, ambulances and emergency vehicles, and to purchase apparatus equipment, ambulances and emergency vehicles, protective and communication equipment and any other accessory equipment necessary for the proper performance of the firefighters’ missions and emergency medical services companies?

What this means

Pennsylvania generally has two types of fire departments and emergency medical service providers: municipality-run teams with paid staff (like Philadelphia) and volunteer-run organizations.

State lawmakers say municipal fire departments and EMS companies need to update their facilities (think fire stations) and equipment (think fire trucks or ambulances), but local budgets are not strong enough to pay for upgrades up front – and loans are not readily available.

As it stands, Pennsylvania law only allows volunteer firefighters and EMS to apply for money through a state-run loan program.


Read about the other May 18 poll questions:

🗳 Visit Procrastinator Billy Penn’s Guide for All Applicants


Created in 1976, the Volunteer Loan Assistance Program authorized nearly $ 500 million in loans for volunteer emergency service providers, with a fixed interest rate of 2%.

Voting “yes” in this referendum means that you support the eligibility of paid fire and emergency medical services businesses for loans, in addition to volunteer organizations.

A “no” vote would keep the Pa loan program available only to volunteer services. According to Pennsylvania League of Women Voters, changing the requirements could increase the number of applicants, vying for a fixed amount of funds.

This bill does not increase the amount of money eligible for the loan fund.

Who is for (and against)

For:

  • Democrats and Republicans in the state legislature unanimously supported the measure.
  • Pennsylvania Fire Emergency Services
  • Pennsylvania Association of Career Fire Chiefs

Versus:

  • We did not find any opposition parties.
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USDA approves drought-affected countries for emergency loans https://taking-sides.com/usda-approves-drought-affected-countries-for-emergency-loans/ https://taking-sides.com/usda-approves-drought-affected-countries-for-emergency-loans/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 22:57:06 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/usda-approves-drought-affected-countries-for-emergency-loans/ In a two-day flurry, the USDA has designated 372 counties, or about one in seven counties in the country, from Texas and Kansas to California and Hawaii, as natural disaster areas due to persistent drought. At the same time, Gov. Gavin Newsom has extended the California drought emergency to 41 counties, including parts of the […]]]>

In a two-day flurry, the USDA has designated 372 counties, or about one in seven counties in the country, from Texas and Kansas to California and Hawaii, as natural disaster areas due to persistent drought. At the same time, Gov. Gavin Newsom has extended the California drought emergency to 41 counties, including parts of the Central Agricultural Valley.

More than 46% of the country, mostly in the west, is in a drought – an unusually large part, according to USDA meteorologist Brad Rippey. “There have only been four times in the history of the Drought Monitor that we have seen more than 40% drought coverage in the United States at the beginning of May,” Rippey said of Iowa. KMA radio.

Natural disaster designations make farmers and ranchers USDA eligible emergency loans, for needs such as replacement of equipment and livestock or financial reorganization. Almost all counties in Arizona, Colorado, California, New Mexico, Nevada, and Wyoming have been declared a primary disaster area by the USDA. Counties in six other states were also declared primary disaster areas. Producers from neighboring counties are also eligible.

To qualify for an emergency loan, producers typically must experience crop losses of at least 30 percent or loss of livestock or other property, according to a USDA. fact sheet. Borrowers are generally required to purchase crop insurance. The maximum loan is $ 500,000.

About 30% of California’s population is covered by the Drought Emergency Proclamation, reported the Los Angeles Times. The drought is expected to worsen the fire season, reduce irrigation supplies for farmers and create a risk to fish and wildlife habitat. Southern California was largely excluded from the proclamation.

“With the reality of climate change very clear in California, we are taking urgent action to address severe water supply shortages in northern and central California, while building our water resilience to protect communities. in the decades to come, ”said Newsom, who called on Californians to reduce water use.

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Emergency small business loans are coming: here’s what you need to know https://taking-sides.com/emergency-small-business-loans-are-coming-heres-what-you-need-to-know/ https://taking-sides.com/emergency-small-business-loans-are-coming-heres-what-you-need-to-know/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 22:57:06 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/emergency-small-business-loans-are-coming-heres-what-you-need-to-know/ Under the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) law passed by Congress last week, there should be some relief for small businesses. A program, called the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), begins this Friday. It offers forgivable emergency loans to keep employees on the payroll for at least a few months. However, the PPP, which […]]]>

Under the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) law passed by Congress last week, there should be some relief for small businesses.

A program, called the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), begins this Friday. It offers forgivable emergency loans to keep employees on the payroll for at least a few months.

However, the PPP, which will be managed by the Small Business Administration (SBA), is not the only option.

Below is a quick rundown of three SBA programs available to help small businesses at a time when many are closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

But first, who is eligible for these loans?

Basically, any business with 500 or fewer employees (or no more employees than the number set by the SBA as industry standard). This includes nonprofits, veterans organizations, tribal businesses, sole proprietorships, freelancers, and independent contractors.

How does the Paycheque Protection Program (PPP) work?

The way that the Paycheque Protection Program works is that a business can apply for the loan from a local SBA lender and use the money to cover up to eight weeks of expenses, such as payroll (including benefits), rent, insurance mortgage and utilities.

Loans can be up to two months of your average monthly salary costs last year, plus an additional 25% of that amount, subject to a cap of $ 10 million.

Here is the most important feature of the program, according to Robert Nelson, director of the Massachusetts district office of the SBA: “If the company is able to maintain its employees until June 30, the entire loan could be canceled.

One catch: For the loan to be canceled, it can only be spent on salary costs, mortgage interest, rent, and utility payments within eight weeks of getting the loan. In addition, no more than 25% of the amount remitted may be used for non-salary costs.

The CARES law sets aside $ 349 billion for the PPP. To get a sense of what this represents, consider that in the SBA’s largest fiscal year (Fiscal Year 2018), it lent around $ 30 billion.

According to the SBA, all PPP loans will have the following characteristics:

  • Maximum loan amount of $ 10 million
  • Low interest rate
  • 2 years maturity
  • First payment deferred by six months
  • 100% guaranteed by SBA
  • No warranty requirement
  • No personal guarantee
  • No borrower or lender fees payable to the SBA

Economic disaster loans

As part of the EIDL program, the SBA is offering low-interest loans to small businesses that are suffering economic hardship as a result of the pandemic. Small businesses can apply for loans of up to $ 2 million, with an advance of up to $ 10,000. And to make it easier for borrowers, the first payments are not due for 12 months.

Here are some other key features of EIDL loans:

  • Maximum loan amount of $ 2 million
  • 3.75% interest rate for for-profit businesses
  • 2.75% for eligible private non-profit entities
  • Loan maturity extended to 30 years
  • Loans financed by the US Treasury
  • No collateral required for loans under $ 25,000
  • No application fees and no obligation to take out the loan if offered
  • Personal guarantees will be required from persons holding 20% ​​or more of the company

With an EIDL, it can take up to 21 days for local SBA administrators to make a decision, and an additional 5-7 days for funds to close. If time is of the essence, you may want to research a P3 loan first, as local lenders may be able to get money for a business faster.

Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program (EBL)

This program aims to provide an immediate short term loan of up to $ 25,000 to deal with a business disaster. The idea is to use it as a gateway while waiting for longer term funding.

On March 25, the SBA expanded the Express bridging loan pilot program eligibility to include small businesses nationwide that have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

One thing to note, however, is that only “SBA Express Lenders” can grant these loans. And only companies with a previous relationship with the lender can get them. So, as businesses look for short-term capital to stay afloat, they should ask their lender if that’s an option, Nelson said.

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Should you refinance or wait for your student loan forgiveness? https://taking-sides.com/should-you-refinance-or-wait-for-your-student-loan-forgiveness/ https://taking-sides.com/should-you-refinance-or-wait-for-your-student-loan-forgiveness/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 22:57:06 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/should-you-refinance-or-wait-for-your-student-loan-forgiveness/ Student loan debt has reached a boiling point for many Americans, and lawmakers are taking note. Cancellation of student emergency loans was one of many college-related items on President Biden’s campaign agenda, and Congressional Democrats like Elizabeth Warren pushed it in the early months of her presidency to adopt these proposals. Student loan cancellation seems […]]]>

Student loan debt has reached a boiling point for many Americans, and lawmakers are taking note. Cancellation of student emergency loans was one of many college-related items on President Biden’s campaign agenda, and Congressional Democrats like Elizabeth Warren pushed it in the early months of her presidency to adopt these proposals. Student loan cancellation seems more and more possible, prompting many borrowers to question their options in the meantime. In particular, borrowers may be torn between the possibility of a student loan forgiveness and the reality of low student loan rates through refinancing.

What are the current student loan forgiveness proposals?

Biden has already mentioned that Congress should deal with easing the student loan debt crisis. But he’s already working with his firm to explore ways to cancel student loan debt in one form or another without the approval of Congress. He expressed support for a proposal that would write off $ 10,000 in federal student loan debt per borrower, a move that would wipe out all of the federal student loan debt by approximately 15 million borrowers. It also supports the overhaul of the civil service loan forgiveness to provide $ 10,000 annually for up to five years to eligible borrowers who participate in the program.

Senator Elizabeth Warren, meanwhile, urged Biden to increase one-time relief for $ 50,000 per federal borrower. Under this plan, more than 36 million borrowers could see their federal loans canceled. Of that number, nearly 10 million borrowers currently in arrears or in default on their student loans would see their loans completely wiped out.

Even though there is a lot of talk, there isn’t a lot of action, at least not on a large scale. Biden removed student loan cancellation from his most recent stimulus package earlier this year, but he has taken more modest steps to cancel student loans for people with total and permanent disabilities and those who had been ripped off by old colleges. The stimulus bill also reduce the tax burden of canceling student loans until 2025, which many believe paves the way for a broader student loan cancellation strategy.

Why borrowers are refinancing their student loans now

When the coronavirus pandemic hit and the Fed cut interest rates, student loan rates fell to all-time lows. Even over a year later refinancing rate currently start as low as 1.9% variable and 2.5% fixed.

It’s easy to see why refinancing is attractive to borrowers who took out student loans when rates were high. Federal student loans for the 2018-19 school year just a few years ago had rates of 5.05% for undergraduates and 6.6% for graduates. If you had poor credit when you took out the loans, your private student loan rates could be even higher, even in the double digits.

In today’s environment of low interest rates, many borrowers choose to refinance these loans and lock in rates below 5%. Reducing a few percentage points may not seem like a big deal, but it can ultimately save you hundreds or thousands of dollars on your loan.

The Cons of Refinancing Federal Student Loans

Many federal student loan borrowers may be considering these low interest rates, especially since the administrative forbearance period comes to an end in september. However, while refinancing has few drawbacks if you have private student loans, borrowers with federal student loans have other considerations to keep in mind:

  • Biden’s rebate would only apply to federal loans. The student loan cancellation proposals outlined above are far from guaranteed, but some relief is possible – and if it does, it will only affect borrowers on federal student loans. If you refinance your federal student loans to private loans, you will no longer be eligible for any future loan relief from the federal government.
  • Refinancing eliminates other forgiveness options. Even if Biden’s proposals do not pass, there are federal student loan cancellation opportunities that you will lose if you refinance. For example, you might be eligible for a income based repayment plan Where Public service loan remission, which will write off your student loan balance after about 20 or 10 years of payments, respectively.
  • Federal forbearance is generally better than private forbearance. When you transfer your loans from the federal to the private through refinancing, you lose your federal protections, such as the deferral and the current forbearance period. These protections are vital for millions of borrowers who cannot afford to repay their student loans due to the COVID-19 crisis. This means that if there is another holdback, your refinanced loans will not be included.

The bottom line: should you wait for student loan cancellation or refinancing?

While refinancing may be a good idea for some, it is not for everyone. Consider your options carefully to see if this makes sense. For most federal borrowers, it’s generally best to avoid refinancing, even without the prospect of a looming student loan forgiveness. Federal student loans have more advantages than private loans, and if you are keen on canceling student loans, you may be able to get it through income-tested or PSLF repayment if Biden’s proposals fail.

Learn more:

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Voters remove governor’s emergency powers https://taking-sides.com/voters-remove-governors-emergency-powers/ https://taking-sides.com/voters-remove-governors-emergency-powers/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 22:57:06 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/voters-remove-governors-emergency-powers/ Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf visits Erie to encourage COVID-19 vaccinations Watch Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf encourage COVID-19 vaccinations during a visit to a mass vaccination clinic at the Bayfront Convention Center in Erie. Greg Wohlford, Erie Times-News Pennsylvania voters had their say on Gov. Tom Wolf’s handling of the pandemic on Tuesday and decided to […]]]>
to play

Pennsylvania voters had their say on Gov. Tom Wolf’s handling of the pandemic on Tuesday and decided to take away some of his emergency powers.

With 81% of constituencies reporting, voters were in favor of limiting the emergency powers of the executive, from 54% to 46%, according to the Associated Press on Wednesday afternoon.

Democrats and Republicans were fight about it for a year shortly after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, setting up a long battle between public health and the impact on the economy.

The governor, state and federal health officials, and Democrats have argued that a healthy economy depends on the health and safety of its residents.

But Republicans have argued that one should not be at the expense of the other, forging ahead with ballot issues to try to limit a governor’s executive powers.

The results

By the end of election night, it was unclear whether primary voters in Pennsylvania were siding with the Democrats or the Republicans. AP had not yet announced the results.

Early Wednesday, 54% of voters chose to limit executive power in an emergency, and 46% of voters wanted to keep it.

Four questions were asked to voters:

  • The first two questions asked voters if they wanted to limit the governor’s power during emergency declarations
  • A third question asked voters whether to ban discrimination based on race or ethnicity, and voters chose ‘yes’ to ban it.
  • The fourth question asked whether fire departments and emergency medical services should be able to apply for loans from a state program, and voters said ‘yes’ they should.

The only results available on Tuesday were for the third and fourth questions.

Voters have chosen to ban discrimination based on race or ethnicity, according to the AP. And they also said yes to allowing first responders to apply for emergency loans.

Both were approved by at least 70% of the vote, according to the PA tally.

Pennsylvanians have been asked to vote on an amendment that would limit a governor’s declaration of disaster to 21 days. Beyond that, legislative approval would be required.

They also voted on an amendment that would allow state lawmakers to remove the governor’s disaster declarations with a two-thirds vote.

What this means

The results of the referendum questions won’t have much of an impact on Wolf, who has a limited term and cannot run for four more years.

The main results will have a major impact on the governor elected in 2022 and those who will follow.

What could change? Not a lot. At least not the things people argued the most about during the pandemic, like mask orders and business closings.

Disaster declarations, such as those used during snowstorms and the opioid epidemic, are primarily used to access federal funding and to temporarily override regulations.

A new change is that the GOP-controlled legislature would have, if voters approve, the power and responsibility to overturn or renew a disaster declaration after the first 21 days.

It’s a politically risky position, according to JJ Abbott, Democratic strategist and former Wolf’s press secretary.

As he pointed out on Tuesday night, lawmakers should decide whether to reverse a COVID disaster declaration and, in fact, end a moratorium on evictions and foreclosures.

What authority would change

If the measures are ultimately passed, the legislature would not have the power to terminate the powers of the Department of Health, which are protected by the Disease Prevention Act, Abbott said.

Lawmakers would not only have to agree to and deal with major statewide disasters like the pandemic and the opioid crisis, but they would also take responsibility for several local emergencies, such as floods, blizzards. and more.

“It seems like a huge political mess on their part,” Abbott said. “And not something they really thought of when they sought that political retribution.”

Because it takes a week to pass a resolution, lawmakers would have to return to Harrisburg for two weeks at a time to extend or rescind each disaster declaration.

The legislature would not be able to relinquish this responsibility without another constitutional amendment, if the voters approve it.

Lawmakers gain more responsibility and “huge political risk if they screw something up in the middle of an emergency,” Abbott said.

Following: Lou Barletta, a Trump supporter, former congressman and mayor, is running for Palestinian Authority governor

Following: House GOP wants it to be “easy to vote but hard to cheat”. What electoral laws can change in PA

Why they voted

Primaries after a presidential election generally have a lower turnout.

Many voters said they were motivated to go to the polls because of questions about executive power.

Wolf and former Secretary of State for Health Dr Rachel Levine put in place COVID-19 restrictions that they saw as necessary protections against a deadly disease without a cure. But some Pennsylvanians considered the measures too drastic.

“There is enormous anger against Wolf and Levine, and the draconian closures they put in place,” said Charlie Gerow, Republican strategist in Harrisburg.

It was the polling questions that brought Cathie Miller to the Central Bucks Seniors Community Center in Doylestown Township on Tuesday.

“There were a few (contested races), but it wasn’t a big competition. It’s the polling questions that got me here today, ”said Miller, who runs a family-owned coffee service business in Lansdale.

Along with her husband and son, both named Thomas, the three operate Thomas O. Miller & Co. Inc., a business that supplies offices with coffee.

That endeavor came to a halt a year ago when pandemic mitigation measures were put in place as part of Wolf’s disaster declaration. The offices provided by the Miller company have been closed indefinitely.

Even though more non-essential businesses were opened throughout the year, employers were widely encouraged to keep office workers working remotely whenever possible.

Miller said his family’s business has been cut in half. They are recovering from the pandemic, but very slowly.

“We’re hoping to bounce back by the summer, but it’s been a struggle and (Wolf) hasn’t helped small businesses at all,” Miller added.

Buckingham resident Erick Mazzoni said he supports referendums because he is most interested in “keeping the Republican Party strong and stopping the lockdown. Those are the two most important things.” .

Stanley Kopertowski, who voted in Lower Makefield on Tuesday morning, agreed.

“I want to limit the control of our government, so I think it’s important that the legislature votes on such issues,” Kopertowski said.

Pat DellaVecchia, an independent voter from Lower Makefield, was also frustrated with Wolf’s powers during the pandemic.

“Personally, I don’t want the governor to have more power than he already has,” he said. “It is important.”

Following: ‘Overwhelmed with hope’: Dr Rachel Levine makes history by working on the Biden agenda

Bucks County Courier Times reporters Chris Ullery, Marion Callahan and Ashley Williams contributed to this report.

Candy Woodall is a reporter for the USA TODAY Network Pennsylvania Capital Bureau. She can be reached at 717-480-1783 or on Twitter at @candynotcandace.

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Abortion restrictions and contributions to Ted Cruz’s campaign https://taking-sides.com/abortion-restrictions-and-contributions-to-ted-cruzs-campaign/ https://taking-sides.com/abortion-restrictions-and-contributions-to-ted-cruzs-campaign/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 22:57:06 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/abortion-restrictions-and-contributions-to-ted-cruzs-campaign/ PETITIONS OF THE WEEK Through Mitchell jagodinski Jul 16, 2021 at 5:16 p.m. This week, we highlight cert petitions asking the Supreme Court to consider, among other things, another case involving state abortion restrictions, as well as a constitutional challenge to limits on reimbursement for ” personal loans ”made by political candidates at their own […]]]>
PETITIONS OF THE WEEK

This week, we highlight cert petitions asking the Supreme Court to consider, among other things, another case involving state abortion restrictions, as well as a constitutional challenge to limits on reimbursement for ” personal loans ”made by political candidates at their own election. campaigns.

The Supreme Court received a series of abortion challenges during the 2020-2021 term. Two petitions have been pending since the spring: one concerns the rights of unemancipated minors and the other concerns the constitutionality of an Arkansas law prohibiting abortions requested on the basis of a prenatal test indicating Down syndrome. (This week’s petitions previously covered these two petitions here.) In May, judges awarded cert in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization to answer the larger question of whether all predictability bans on elective abortions are unconstitutional. Now, Schmitt v. Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region, Inc. adds to the list of pending petitions on abortion laws. Filed on June 30, she asks judges to consider another ban on abortions performed solely on the basis of a diagnosis of trisomy 21, and she explicitly asks the court to examine whether the right to abortion, recognized in Roe vs. Wade, must be canceled.

In 2019, Missouri passed legislation imposing various restrictions on abortion, including a ban on abortions performed solely because of a diagnosis of Down’s syndrome. Planned Parenthood challenged the law and the district court prevented it from coming into force. The United States Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit upheld and Missouri requested a Supreme Court review.

Missouri presents evidence that the abortion rate for children with Down’s syndrome in America is between 67% and 93%, which represents what the state considers a “genocidal crisis” and prompts Missouri and at least 11 other states enact laws restricting abortions performed on the basis of disability. Similar laws have been applied in the 6th Circuit but invalidated in the 7th Circuit. Missouri urges Supreme Court to grant certificate and consider Down syndrome provision alongside Mississippi law challenged in Dobbs.

Then in Federal Election Commission c. Ted Cruz for the Senate, judges are presented with a declaration of jurisdiction implying restrictions on the repayment of a candidate’s “personal loans” made to finance an election campaign. Federal law imposes three relevant restrictions on campaign funds: First, candidates must not use post-election contributions to repay personal loans over $ 250,000; second, portions of a personal loan that exceed $ 250,000 can only be repaid to the candidate through pre-election contributions if repayment is made within 20 days of the election; and third, if a loan over $ 250,000 remains unpaid 20 days after the election, any portion over $ 250,000 must be requalified as a contribution rather than a loan.

In 2018, Senator Ted Cruz, R-Tex., Ran for re-election. A day before the general election, Ted Cruz loaned $ 260,000 to his committee. After the 20-day deadline following the election had expired, $ 10,000 of the $ 260,000 loan was to be reclassified as a contribution. Cruz was then reimbursed the statutory maximum of $ 250,000. This series of events was carried out with “the sole and exclusive motivation” to establish the factual basis for challenging the loan repayment restrictions. The district court ruled that the senator had standing to bring an action based on the $ 10,000 “financial loss” he suffered and ruled that the limitation on loan repayment violated the First Amendment. The Federal Election Commission argues that such contributions made after an election, to repay personal loans made by the candidate, create an increased risk of corruption, and the commission asks the court to refer for further consideration of standing. or submit the case for consideration in plenary to decide the constitutional question.

These and others petitions of the week are below:

Schmitt v. Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region, Inc.
21-3
Problems: (1) If Missouri’s restriction on abortions performed only because the unborn child may have Down syndrome is categorically invalid under Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey and Roe vs. Wade, or whether it is valid and reasonable abortion regulation that seeks to prevent the elimination of children with Down syndrome through eugenic abortion; (2) whether Missouri’s restrictions on abortions performed after eight, 14, 18, and 20 weeks gestational age are categorically invalid, or whether they are valid and reasonable abortion regulations that advance interests important to the state; and (3) if the “penumbra” right to abortion recognized in Roe vs. Wade, and partially reaffirmed in Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey, must be canceled.

Federal Election Commission c. Ted Cruz for the Senate
21-12
Problems: (1) Do the respondents have standing to challenge the legal limit on the repayment of the loan of 52 USC 30116 (j); and (2) whether the loan repayment limit violates the First Amendment freedom of speech clause.

Tickets c. Mentor Worldwide, LLC
21-26
Problem: Does Preemption Under Medical Device Amendments To Food, Drugs And Cosmetics Act Support Rejection Of Rule 12 (b) (6) Of State Common Law Claims Alleging Failure To warning due to inaccurate post-sale post-approval public reporting of unwanted drugs and allegations of faulty manufacture of medical devices.

Arrow Highway Steel v. Dubin
21-27
Problems: (1) Can the dormant trade clause be used to invalidate the application of a neutral and non-discriminatory toll law of a state to defeat the execution of the stipulated judgment of a former resident when there is no evidence of burden or discrimination against interstate commerce; and (2) whether the dormant commerce clause applies to state law without intended or demonstrated effect on interstate commerce.

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Appeals court refuses to reinstate North Carolina abortion ban :: WRAL.com https://taking-sides.com/appeals-court-refuses-to-reinstate-north-carolina-abortion-ban-wral-com/ https://taking-sides.com/appeals-court-refuses-to-reinstate-north-carolina-abortion-ban-wral-com/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 22:57:06 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/appeals-court-refuses-to-reinstate-north-carolina-abortion-ban-wral-com/ Richmond, Virginia – A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that North Carolina’s ban on abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy was unconstitutional, and the court refused to reinstate the ban, which a lower court overturned earlier is two years old. The 20-week ban was first passed in 1973. It was the year the United States […]]]>

– A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that North Carolina’s ban on abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy was unconstitutional, and the court refused to reinstate the ban, which a lower court overturned earlier is two years old.

The 20-week ban was first passed in 1973. It was the year the United States Supreme Court issued its Roe v. Wade protecting abortion as a constitutional right until a fetus develops enough to live outside the womb, usually between 24 and 28 weeks.

While abortion remains legal in all 50 states, 43 have some form of restriction on the procedure after a fetus has become viable. North Carolina lawmakers supporting the ban have argued that viability can range from 20 to 22 weeks.

Abortion providers challenged the 20-week ban in 2016, shortly after the General Assembly approved several other abortion-related restrictions, such as a 72-hour waiting period for a woman gets an abortion, limits on who can perform an abortion, and a narrower exception for emergency loans under which a woman would be exempt from the 20 week limit.

Previously, the procedure was allowed if there was a “significant risk” to the health of the woman. Lawmakers changed this to only allow it in situations where the mother was at risk of death or severe and irreversible damage due to an urgent medical emergency.

Three doctors said they feared prosecution under the updated law, but state attorneys argued that the doctors had no right to challenge the law because they had failed to do so. subject to no charges or administrative action. No one has been prosecuted for performing an abortion in North Carolina for years, state prosecutors have said.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. 4th Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., However, unanimously ruled that lawmakers’ decision to expand abortion restrictions makes it clear that they plan to d ‘to apply the law.

“Amid a wave of similar state actions across the country, North Carolina enacted legislation to restrict the availability of abortions and impose stricter requirements on abortion providers and women seeking abortions,” wrote the judges in their decision. “Given these facts, we cannot reasonably assume that the abortion ban that North Carolina keeps on its books is“ largely symbolic. ”Accordingly, we agree with the district court that the providers have established a credible threat of prosecution and therefore have standing to bring such action. ”

There was no immediate word on whether the state would seek a 4th Circuit court hearing or appeal the decision to the U.S. Supreme Court.

“A patient should be able to make important medical decisions without interference from politicians,” Dr. Katherine Farris, chief medical officer of Planned Parenthood South Atlantic, said in a statement. “When someone has made the decision to have an abortion, they should be able to get one, without facing unnecessary restrictions that force them to delay care or carry a pregnancy to term against their will.”

Federal courts have already struck down other abortion laws passed by North Carolina lawmakers. In 2014, they blocked a 2011 law requiring abortion providers to show and describe an ultrasound to pregnant women.

Meanwhile, abortion clinics, doctors and others filed a lawsuit in state court last September, seeking to overturn five other restrictions on abortion, including the period of abortion. 72 hour wait.

The Republican-controlled General Assembly, however, was not discouraged. The legislature last week passed a ban on abortions following a prenatal diagnosis of Down’s syndrome, and a proposal that would require doctors to care for an infant who survived a botched abortion has been approved by the government. Senate.

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Planned Parenthood PPP Loans Sparks Pro-Life Censorship | Baptist-life https://taking-sides.com/planned-parenthood-ppp-loans-sparks-pro-life-censorship-baptist-life/ https://taking-sides.com/planned-parenthood-ppp-loans-sparks-pro-life-censorship-baptist-life/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 22:57:06 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/planned-parenthood-ppp-loans-sparks-pro-life-censorship-baptist-life/ WASHINGTON (BP) – A report that affiliates of the country’s largest abortion provider received $ 80 million in loans to help small businesses during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic drew strong disapproval from the share of life advocates inside and outside Congress. Thirty-seven affiliates of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) have applied for and […]]]>

WASHINGTON (BP) – A report that affiliates of the country’s largest abortion provider received $ 80 million in loans to help small businesses during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic drew strong disapproval from the share of life advocates inside and outside Congress.

Thirty-seven affiliates of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) have applied for and received the federal money despite being ineligible for the paycheck protection program requirements, according to an exclusive Fox News report on Tuesday.

The Paycheck Protection Program, which is administered by the US Small Business Administration, was designed to help retain employees in small businesses – including churches and nonprofits – that are at risk of shutting down and / or to fire workers because of the government. restrictions in response to the pandemic. The Small Business Administration is demanding repayment of loans made to PPFA affiliates, Fox News reported.

According to its 2019 annual report, Planned Parenthood performed more than 345,000 abortions and received $ 616.8 million in government grants and reimbursements.

“At a time when we are all concerned with protecting lives and livelihoods, it is maddening to see, once again, that nothing – not even a global pandemic – will stop Planned Parenthood from pursuing death.” Southern Baptist pro-life leader Russell Moore said in written comments on Wednesday.

The federal government is “rightly asking” for repayment of the loans, said Moore, chairman of the Commission on Ethics and Religious Freedom (ERLC). “We need to stay focused on fighting this virus and saving lives. Planned Parenthood’s actions show he doesn’t care about the first because he never cared about the second. “

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a speech on May 20:

“Failure to respect human life is [Planned Parenthood’s] central mission, and they just took advantage of a national crisis and used tens of millions of taxpayer dollars that they were clearly, clearly prohibited from taking. It goes without saying that the money must be returned immediately, right away. “

Contacted by Baptist Press, the Small Business Administration press office said in a written statement: “We do not comment on individual borrowers.”

Affiliates of organizations with more than 500 employees, including those working for affiliates, are not eligible for Paycheck Protection Program loans. Loan applicants should verify the number of “full-time equivalent employees,” according to the SBA, which also states on its website, “knowingly making a false statement to obtain a loan under this program is punishable by law. “.

Senator Marco Rubio, R-Fla., Chairman of the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, said in a written statement that the SBA “should open an investigation into how these loans were made in gross violation of the applicable membership rules and if provided Parenthood, banks or SBA staff have knowingly violated the law, all appropriate legal options should be sought. “

Senator James Lankford, R-Okla., A Southern Baptist, asked Planned Parenthood to return the money, saying, “Every dollar that Planned Parenthood took out of the Paycheck Protection Program was a dollar that didn’t. failed to reach eligible legitimate small businesses. “

At the time of publication, PPFA had not responded to a request for comment from Baptist Press.

On March 24, Moore and more than 50 other pro-life leaders urged public health officials to act to prevent the promotion of abortion during the coronavirus crisis.

In a letter to HHS Secretary Alex Azar, they said Planned Parenthood and other organizations promote and perform abortions while other elective procedures are delayed. By stopping abortions, Planned Parenthood would make medical equipment available with limited supply as the coronavirus spreads in this country, protect women who may need care from an overburdened health system after post complications. -abortion and would reduce the burden on emergency rooms, according to the letter.

Tom Strode is the Washington bureau chief for Baptist Press.

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