Film adaptations – Taking Sides http://taking-sides.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 15:51:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://taking-sides.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-26-120x120.png Film adaptations – Taking Sides http://taking-sides.com/ 32 32 BookTok, COVID, and the Resurgence of Book-Film Adaptations – The Mesa Press https://taking-sides.com/booktok-covid-and-the-resurgence-of-book-film-adaptations-the-mesa-press/ Tue, 17 May 2022 15:51:31 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/booktok-covid-and-the-resurgence-of-book-film-adaptations-the-mesa-press/ Whether it’s due to the dominance of TikTok and social media to spark interest in certain areas or the increase in time spent alone indoors due to the pandemic, a surge in interest in modern novels led to a significant increase in book-to-film adaptation releases. This year. With movie production and release returning to a […]]]>

Whether it’s due to the dominance of TikTok and social media to spark interest in certain areas or the increase in time spent alone indoors due to the pandemic, a surge in interest in modern novels led to a significant increase in book-to-film adaptation releases. This year.

With movie production and release returning to a new normal, many studios have been listening closely to the books and stories that American audiences have come to love in recent years. From a slew of young adult (YA) novels to romance to thrillers, 2022 has already started to prove itself as the year for book adaptations. Only Netflix has already released its series adaptation of Alice Oseman’s “Heartstopper” and the recent release of the film “Along for the Ride” written by Sarah Dessen. In February, Apple TV saw the release of “The Sky is Everywhere” by Jandy Nelson. Hulu jumped on the adaptation trend early on with the release of Sally Thorne’s ‘The Hating Game’ in December last year and more recent releases such as America’s favorite author ‘Conversations with Friends’. Internet, Sally Rooney.

With the anticipation of more book-to-movie or series adaptations to come in the coming year, the following includes a look at some of the stories that will be featured in the coming months.

Delia Owens’ “Where the Crawdads Sing” follows Kya Clark, a reserved young woman who grew up alone along the Deep South swamps, where she faces judgment and criticism from nearby townspeople. However, after a young man she befriends is murdered, she becomes the prime suspect in the murder and is forced to defend herself in front of the city that has always judged her. The film, directed by Olivia Newman, is set to premiere on Netflix on July 15. The film stars Daisy Edgar-Jones, who starred in “Normal People” and “Fresh,” and Taylor John Smith of “Sharp Objects.” The original book is highly regarded by book enthusiasts for the unique atmosphere and vivid depiction of Delia Owens’ writing.

Christopher Pike’s “The Midnight Club” is a young adult mystery series that was originally released in 1994 and follows five teenagers struggling with terminal illness who make a pact in an attempt to contact each other from beyond the grave. The powerful book tackles the difficult themes of death and morality from a unique perspective while creating a sense of nostalgia and love in many readers. Netflix and horror director Mike Flannagan produced the adaptation of the novel, which is due out in late October or November this year.

“My Policeman” by Bethan Roberts is a queer contemporary novel centering on the relationship between Marion, a teacher who is married to Tom, her policeman. The only problem is that Tom meets a unique museum curator named Patrick, who begins to show him a life he could never have imagined. Filled with betrayal and self-discovery, the film adaptation, directed by Michael Grandage, is slated for release this fall. The film stars Emma Corin as Marion, Harry Styles as Tom, and David Dawson as Patrick.

While this is just a small preview of the many different book adaptations set to be released this year, the growing popularity of reading and the dedication of avid fans is becoming increasingly evident.

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10 Best Film Adaptations Of Stephen King’s Books, According To Ranker https://taking-sides.com/10-best-film-adaptations-of-stephen-kings-books-according-to-ranker/ Tue, 10 May 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/10-best-film-adaptations-of-stephen-kings-books-according-to-ranker/ With a new adaptation of Fire starter set to terrify audiences, horror connoisseurs turn to discuss the myriad adaptations of Stephen King’s works. King’s books are some of the most popular of all time, and their film adaptations are beloved by many fans as well. In order to settle the debate over which is the […]]]>

With a new adaptation of Fire starter set to terrify audiences, horror connoisseurs turn to discuss the myriad adaptations of Stephen King’s works. King’s books are some of the most popular of all time, and their film adaptations are beloved by many fans as well. In order to settle the debate over which is the best, the team at Ranker has put together a comprehensive list of their users’ favorites.

Sure, King is known as one of the forefathers of modern horror literature – but he’s also branched out into different genres over the years. He’s one of the most influential American authors of all time, so it’s no surprise that his books have been adapted numerous times.

ten Scary Show (1982)

Directed by George A. Romero, horror show is a horror anthology film based on the story of the same name by King. It consists of five chilling stories from King’s original book, all of which feature different elements of horror and terror through their unique stories.

RELATED: The 10 Best TV Horror Miniseries, Ranked By IMDb

The stories feature actors such as Leslie Nielsen and Ed Harris, alongside Stephen King himself as Jordy Verrill. The film may not be the most well-known of King’s adaptations, but it’s still an underrated gem that shows off plenty of cinematic and storytelling skill.

9 Pet sematary (1989)

Gage Creed with a knife in Pet Sematary.

Pet sematary tells the story of Louis Creed and his family, who move into a new home and soon learn that the old cemetery on their property holds dark and mysterious secrets. It is one of King’s most successful supernatural stories, and the film received critical acclaim.

Although the film’s sequel wasn’t received as positively, the film remains an exciting and thrilling addition to the ’80s supernatural genre. film for two exciting hours.

8 It (2017)

Pennywise holding a balloon.

This is one of Stephen King’s best-known books to date, so it’s no surprise that the film adaptation is equally beloved by modern audiences. The main antagonist, Pennywise the Clown, quickly became one of the most iconic horror villains of all time.

Although This Deviates a bit from the source material, it’s still a hugely exciting and engaging horror movie that’s topped off with a fantastic performance from Bill Skarsgard as Pennywise. The film is filled with so many terrifying scenes and scary lines – This is a great piece of horror for critics and fans alike.

7 It (1990)

Tim Curry as Pennywise in the IT miniseries

by Stephen King This has been adapted twice over the years, and it’s the original 1990 version that is considered by most fans to be the best. Although technically a miniseries, Tommy Lee Wallace This can still be easily viewed in one sitting like a movie. And not only is it more faithful to King’s original vision, it’s also considered by most to be much more nostalgic.

RELATED: 10 Horror Movies Just As Terrifying As Their Book Counterparts

Full of genuine scares and spooky moments, the movie doesn’t let audiences breathe for even a second. Tim Curry’s portrayal of Pennywise is truly terrifying, if much more exaggerated and exaggerated than Skarsgard’s.

6 The Shining (1980)

Shelley Duvall in The Shining

Stanley Kubrick’s film adaptation of Stephen King’s horror masterpiece the brilliant is widely admired among horror fans these days, despite a very mixed reception upon its release. It perfectly matches the tone and mood of the original novel, while simultaneously adding its own horrifying highlights.

the brilliant is most notable for the incredible performance of Jack Nicholson as Jack Torrence, who is slowly losing his mind to supernatural forces at the Overlook Hotel. Danny Lloyd also provides one of the best child acting performances in any horror film as Nicholson’s son, Danny.

5 Carrie (1976)

Carrie

Carrie was Stephen King’s first published novel, and Brian de Palma’s adaptation also happens to be one of the defining films in the supernatural horror genre. The story follows a young girl named Carrie, who realizes she has supernatural powers and loses control of them when her classmates start bullying her.

RELATED: Every Stephen King Movie Adaptation That Isn’t A Horror Movie, Ranked

Like much of Stephen King’s work, Carrie explores the dangers and consequences of social exclusion and isolation. It’s a theme that’s often present in his books, but it’s overwhelmingly clear here in his first effort. De Palma’s film also explores these ideas very effectively.

4 Support Me (1986)

Stand-by-Me

You’d be forgiven for not knowing support me is based on a short story by Stephen King, because it really doesn’t fit the same criteria as most of his books. The story, originally titled “The Body”, tells the story of a group of children who discover a dead body and wonder what to do with it.

support me is considered one of the best coming-of-age films of the 1980s, telling a seemingly timeless story that every generation can relate to – one of friendship, loneliness and longing. The film perfectly captures the dreamlike spirit of King’s writing.

3 Misery (1990)

Misery may not feature the usual horror tropes you find in King’s work, but it’s an absolutely engrossing thriller that still terrifies audiences. It follows novelist Paul Sheldon as he finds himself in a dangerous car accident, only to be rescued by a woman who claims to be his number one fan.

That woman is Annie Wilkes, and she’s a lot more dangerous and obsessive than she initially seems. She’s played by Kathy Bates in one of the actress’ best roles yet, sending chills through the audience with every line she utters. The novel (and film) is proof that King knows exactly how to pace a thriller to squeeze the maximum tension out of every scene.

2 The Green Line (1999)

Tom Hanks holds back tears in The Green Mile.

The green Line was directed by Frank Darabont and features Tom Hanks, David Morse and Michael Clarke Duncan in some of the best performances of their entire careers. The story centers on a prison guard who encounters an African American inmate accused of murdering two young girls – but who possesses powers beyond his own explanation.

Both the novel and the film seamlessly blend King’s stylistic horror tropes with his deep understanding of humanity, making for an enthralling story that’s both character-driven and full of twists and turns. It’s hugely moving and engaging, and perhaps one of the most thoughtful films based on King‘s works.

1 The Shawshank Redemption (1994)

Shawshank takeover

Also directed by Frank Darabont, The Shawshank Redemption is widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time, and for good reason. It’s packed with philosophical insights and insightful commentary that still hold up incredibly well today, alongside some all-time great performances.

The film represents everything great about Stephen King’s books – their interesting structure, fascinating moral, gripping stories, interesting characters, and satisfying conclusions are all exemplary here. There’s a reason it’s considered one of the best, and it will be for a long time.

NEXT: 10 Best Non-Horrifying Stephen King Characters

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10 Best Book-Movie Adaptations, According To IMDb https://taking-sides.com/10-best-book-movie-adaptations-according-to-imdb/ Sat, 07 May 2022 18:30:00 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/10-best-book-movie-adaptations-according-to-imdb/ 2022 is a big year for book-to-screen adaptations, starring Delia Owen Where the Crawdads sing get the big screen treatment and the announcement of a hunger games prequel based on Suzanne Collins’ The Ballad of Songbirds and Serpents. Literature is undoubtedly one of the best ways to deliver a descriptive story and leave it to […]]]>

2022 is a big year for book-to-screen adaptations, starring Delia Owen Where the Crawdads sing get the big screen treatment and the announcement of a hunger games prequel based on Suzanne Collins’ The Ballad of Songbirds and Serpents. Literature is undoubtedly one of the best ways to deliver a descriptive story and leave it to the power of the imagination to fill in the blanks. However, one source of media that is arguably even more magical than literature is cinema.

When popular novels are made into movies, it creates a whole new world and an exciting opportunity for viewers to visually see history unfold. While there have been plenty of book-to-movie adaptations over the years, there are several that stand the test of time and have pretty high IMDb scores.

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ten Perks of Being a Wallflower (2012) – 8


The Perks of Being a Wallflower movie poster

A novel by Stephen Chbosky, the story of coming of age The perks of Being a Wallflower depicts life through the lens of an outcast, Charlie, trying to find his way in life. Presenting the main character’s personal thoughts through intimate letters, the novel stands the test of time, as the film was created almost two decades after the book was first published in 1999.

Related: 10 Movie Adaptations Better Than The Books, According To Reddit

The film quickly became cult, with the near-perfect casting of Logan Lerman as Charlie, and his best friends played by Emma Watson and Ezra Miller. Fans love both the film and the novel for their raw depiction of complicated and risky teenage life. Although the novel describes Charlie’s story through diary entries and the film shows a simpler point of view, there is no denying that Benefits of being a wallflower is full of memorable quotes and impactful life lessons in both iterations.


9 The Princess Bride (1987) – 8


The Princess Bride movie poster

The romantic and comic story of The princess to be married is loved by many. Between Rob Reiner’s cinematic interpretation and the original novel, fans love the wholesome, classic story of adventure, love, and conquest.

Although it is unknown who the true author of the original novel was, fans may have figured out that S. Morgenstern’s pseudonym was a lie, and instead purely William Goldman’s story. Regardless of who actually wrote the famous story, fans are grateful for the fun, well-thought-out lore behind the novel, and thankful that the plot translated well into the film, even down to the word-for-word quotes.


8 The Help (2011) – 8.1


Set in 1960s Mississippi, Ugly is about an aspiring writer who wants to change society by telling the stories of black women who work as servants for white families. With Kathryn Stockett’s novel published in 2009 and the film made shortly after, it’s quite telling how this story immediately resonated with readers.

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Although the film received critical acclaim, Viola Davis herself expressed concern about the film’s shift in focus towards Skeeter and away from prominent black voices (per Harper’s Bazaar). However, due to the story’s hard-hitting narrative as well as its emphasis on the theme of racism, there’s no doubt that fans love both the novel and the film for a reason.


7 Dune (2021) – 8.1


Dune movie poster

As one of the most successful stories to produce two different adaptations, one in 1984 and one in 2021, Frank Herbert’s action-packed novel shook the world. Across nearly 800 pages, many of the novel’s details were either left out or left to the film’s sequels, but the latest adaptation of Dunes phenomenal among critics.

With the ’80s version’s ranking at 6.3 on IMDb and the new version significantly higher, fans of the book were thrilled that the epic story was getting a second chance to sweep the box office. While it takes a few movies to fully incorporate all the necessary plot points, fans are happy with its extremely accurate adaptation so far.


6 Slumdog Millionaire (2008) – 8


Jamal wins a cash prize in Slumdog Millionaire.

Scoring a solid IMDb score of 8/10, this story gives the unique perspective of a Mumbai teenager accused of cheating in a game of “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?” Loosely based on the novel “Q&A” by Vikas Swarup, the film was made just three years after the book’s publication.

After winning eight Oscars and receiving rave reviews from critics, the story is still hailed by readers and viewers. While there were a few key differences between the book and the movie, including the renaming of the title itself, fans agree the movie was accurate in every category that mattered, and the added fun spins on the footage has even been added to the story, thanks to director Danny Boyle.


5 Gone with the Wind (1939) – 8.2


Gone with the Wind movie poster

carried away by the wind is a classic tale of drama, war, and turbulent love that still has fans talking today. With carried away by the wind being Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell’s one and only novel, it is indicative enough of her talent as a writer to create such an iconic work of literature.

Although the adaptation is one of the longest films in cinematic history, the iconic story is worth it, as it is still considered one of the best romance movies of all time. Although the book delves into Scarlett and Mitchell’s innermost thoughts and feelings, both versions resonate with fans, making them a clear hit as far as adaptations go.


4 The Green Line (1999) – 8.6


The Green Line movie poster

The green Line offers a unique perspective into the daily lives of death row guards as they face charges that change their lives for worse and better. In true Stephen King fashion, the novel and film convey the duality of gloom and optimism in new and intriguing ways.

Although the film omits a few devastating plot points from the book, fans don’t have too much of a problem with the changes, as the film is a little less dark as a result. Plus, with Tom Hanks in the cast, The green Line certainly did the novel justice, as he was clearly perfect for the role of Paul.




3 The Dark Knight (2008) – 9


The Dark Knight movie poster

Named one of the best Batman movies of all time, The black Knight is an iconic story that has been interpreted perfectly, especially when it comes to Heath Ledger’s Joker. Although there was not a single novel the film was based on, The black Knight is more of a compilation of major events from the comics.

Even among movies that aren’t based on superheroes, The black Knight is a highly respected film in the cinematic world, largely due to its earnest tone and deep understanding of Batman’s backstory and motivations. While the film isn’t based on any particular comic, the movie does a great job of portraying the true characteristics of the heroes and villains, while putting things in an even darker, more realistic spin.


2 The Godfather (1972) – 9.2


The Godfather movie poster

The Godfather details the edgy lives of mob members in New York who end up passing on their legacy. Mario Puzo, the story’s original author, published the novel in the ’60s, which was quickly turned into a movie in the mid-’70s.

Related: 10 Best Revenge Movies Of All Time, According To IMDb

Although fans love both the novel and the movie, the endings are quite different, with Vito dying in the book rather than living to become the mob boss like he does in the movie. However, given that the original story may have produced several sequels and even a whole new series, there is no doubt that this iconic film and novel made an impact, as it became a household name due to its gripping story. .


1 The Shawshank Redemption (1994) – 9.3


Shawshank Redemption movie poster

Arguably one of Stephen King’s best stories, The Shawshank Redemption depicts the relationship between two prisoners as they embark on a journey of positive deeds in an effort to change their lives. Although King’s novel was originally titled “Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption”, her true legacy shines through in this dark but uplifting story brought to life on screen.

Earning not just 7 Oscar nominations, but the No. 1 spot on IMDb’s “250 Best Movies” list, there’s no doubt that this story had an incredible impact on viewers. There are significant differences between the Shawshank takeover book and film with many character fates changed in the film. However, whether fans prefer the novel or the movie, the emotional story is one that undoubtedly sticks with fans long after the story is over.

NEXT: 10 Books Considered Unsuitable (But Were Adapted)

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Fences is one of the best stage-to-film adaptations https://taking-sides.com/fences-is-one-of-the-best-stage-to-film-adaptations/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/fences-is-one-of-the-best-stage-to-film-adaptations/ Adaptations of the stage to the film have been frequent throughout the history of cinema. Among the most famous film adaptations of plays are the works of William Shakespeare and Tennessee Williams. by Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, King Lear, and Macbeth, have all received countless adaptations over the years. Williams’ A streetcar named Desire, […]]]>

Adaptations of the stage to the film have been frequent throughout the history of cinema. Among the most famous film adaptations of plays are the works of William Shakespeare and Tennessee Williams. by Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, King Lear, and Macbeth, have all received countless adaptations over the years. Williams’ A streetcar named Desire, cat on a burning roof, and Glass factory were also adapted for the screen. Even though these stage-to-film adaptations are incredibly well-known and rightly admired, Fences deserves to be included in the same conversation.

August Wilson Fences received two Broadway performances. Its first Broadway performance was in 1987. It starred James Earl Jones, Mary Alice, Ray Aranha, Courtney B. Vance and many others. Fences would win 4 Tony Awards in 1987, including Best Play for Wilson and Best Performance by a Leading Actor for Jones. Her second Broadway trip was in 2010 and starred Denzel Washington, Viola Davis, Stephen McKinley Henderson, Mykelti Williamson and Russell Hornsby. These five actors would reprise their Broadway roles in the 2016 film adaptation of Fences.

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Wilson’s Fences is set in Pittsburgh in the late 1950s. The play follows the Maxson family and the struggles they experience both personally and societally. At the center of these troubles is Troy, Washington, the patriarch of the Maxson family. He works alongside Jim Bono (Henderson) as a garbage man to earn a salary to take home for his wife and son. Naturally, Troy isn’t thrilled about picking up trash and expresses his disgust at the way the world has turned out for him. As an up-and-coming baseball star, Troy continued to hone his craft in the black leagues but was never able to go further because of the color barrier. Troy becomes the first black driver of a garbage truck in Pittsburgh after speaking out about the practices of his placement company. Troy’s dissatisfaction with his life spills over into his relationships with the rest of his family, including his wife, two sons, and younger brother.

When the opportunity for Troy’s youngest son Cory (Jovan Adepo) arises to potentially play college football, Troy refuses to treat it as a possibility. Recalling his own experiences trying to play professional sports, he insists that all of his children need to build a reasonable life for themselves so they don’t spend so much time chasing a dream they don’t forget. to prepare for their future. . Tension between Cory and Troy continues to grow as they work to build a fence around the house. Troy’s wife Rose (Davis) tries to plead Cory’s case, but he won’t hear her. Rose often challenges Troy and even gives money to Lyon (Hornsby), Troy’s oldest son from a previous relationship, after Troy refuses.

Troy is perceived as a tough and practical man. Washington is fantastic at portraying the intensity of Troy and shares several heartbreaking scenes with Davis and Adepo. After learning that Troy had an affair, he tells Rose that he got the woman pregnant. Davis and Washington share an Oscar-level moment where Rose reminds Troy that they shared the same experiences and that Troy can’t be blamed solely for his mistakes. The mother of Troy’s newborn daughter dies during childbirth, and Troy brings Raynell home, asking Rose for help in raising her. In another memorable scene, Rose agrees to take care of Raynell, but tells Troy, “Right now this child has a mother, but you’re a man without a wife.”

Troy’s treatment of Cory, Lyons, and his younger brother, Gabe (Williamson), are other examples of his rough personality. He berates Cory and Lyons’ dreams and takes advantage of Gabe. Gabe’s mental impairment as a result of his service in World War II often results in short-lived patience from others. Troy eventually decides to institutionalize him and have him send the other half of Gabe’s monthly pension in order to keep his family afloat financially. At one point, Cory asks Troy about her apparent dislike for him, and Troy responds with, “Who said I had to like you?”

In addition to playing the role of Fences’ lead, Washington also directed the 2016 film adaptation. Washington’s previous experience with the play gave him the insight to create a meaningful adaptation of Wilson’s work. It’s somewhat comparable to Paul Newman’s experience with the work of Tennessee Williams. Newman starred in the film adaptation of Cat on a hot tin roof and continued to lead Glass factory in 1987. Washington would go on to produce the 2020 Netflix movie, Ma Rainey’s black background, another of Wilson’s plays. Washington’s leadership Fences received 4 Oscar nominations in 2017, including Best Picture.

Washington and Davis first found success with Fences in 2010, where they both won Tony Awards for their performances. The 2016 film would also earn Davis her first Oscar. Davis’ role in Fences would be her third Oscar nomination, as she had previously been nominated for Doubt and Ugly. After his success with Fences, Davis would star in another film adaptation of one of Wilson’s plays. She would receive another Oscar nomination for her starring role in the Netflix production of Wilson’s Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.

Translating a stage production into a film is not as easy as it seems. However, the experience that the cast of Fences is able to bring to the screen their previous portrayals of their roles blending well with the new cast additions. Collectively, the whole thing works incredibly well together. Their individual performances and delivery of some of Wilson’s most powerful lines are truly masterful. Leonardo DiCaprio’s Romeo from Baz Luhrman’s 1996 film and Marlon Brando’s Stanley Kowalski from the 1951 adaptation of A tram called Désir are two of the most notorious performances from stage to film. The cast of Fences surely made their case to be immortalized on the same pedestal, as there isn’t a single person who fails to deliver in their performance.

Fences is available for rent on Amazon Prime.

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25 of Shakespeare’s best film adaptations | Entertainment https://taking-sides.com/25-of-shakespeares-best-film-adaptations-entertainment/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/25-of-shakespeares-best-film-adaptations-entertainment/ Shakespeare is widely recognized as one of the greatest English-language writers of all time. His beautiful language, portrayals of human nature, and mastery of writing dirty jokes have earned him an iconic place in the literary canon. So it seems a natural consequence that artists want to translate Shakespeare’s works into other mediums, including artwork, […]]]>

Shakespeare is widely recognized as one of the greatest English-language writers of all time. His beautiful language, portrayals of human nature, and mastery of writing dirty jokes have earned him an iconic place in the literary canon. So it seems a natural consequence that artists want to translate Shakespeare’s works into other mediums, including artwork, novelizations, and a seemingly endless number of screen adaptations.

But which of these adaptations is most successful in bringing Shakespeare’s genius to a wider audience? How do the films compare to the original texts by the bard themselves? In honor of the anniversary of Shakespeare’s death on April 23, 1616, Stacker sought to answer these questions by compiling the 25 best film adaptations of Shakespeare. The films were taken from Shakespeare’s writing credits on IMDb, filtered only into feature film adaptations (no filmed stage productions). Films had to have at least 1,000 votes and an IMDb user rating of 7.0 to be considered. Data is updated in April 2022.

From a contemporary adaptation that earned Denzel Washington an Oscar nomination to a ’60s image that hasn’t been available at home for nearly 50 years, read on to see which Shakespeare film adaptations have made the cut. chopped off.

You might also like: Can you answer those real “Jeopardy!” questions about the movies?

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25 of Shakespeare’s best film adaptations | Parker https://taking-sides.com/25-of-shakespeares-best-film-adaptations-parker/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/25-of-shakespeares-best-film-adaptations-parker/ Shakespeare is widely recognized as one of the greatest English-language writers of all time. His beautiful language, portrayals of human nature, and mastery of writing dirty jokes have earned him an iconic place in the literary canon. So it seems a natural consequence that artists want to translate Shakespeare’s works into other mediums, including artwork, […]]]>

Shakespeare is widely recognized as one of the greatest English-language writers of all time. His beautiful language, portrayals of human nature, and mastery of writing dirty jokes have earned him an iconic place in the literary canon. So it seems a natural consequence that artists want to translate Shakespeare’s works into other mediums, including artwork, novelizations, and a seemingly endless number of screen adaptations.

But which of these adaptations is most successful in bringing Shakespeare’s genius to a wider audience? How do the films compare to the original texts of the bard themselves? In honor of the anniversary of Shakespeare’s death on April 23, 1616, Stacker sought to answer these questions by compiling the 25 best film adaptations of Shakespeare. The films were taken from Shakespeare’s writing credits on IMDb, filtered only into feature film adaptations (no filmed stage productions). Films had to have at least 1,000 votes and an IMDb user rating of 7.0 to be considered. Data is updated in April 2022.

From a contemporary adaptation that earned Denzel Washington an Oscar nomination to a ’60s image that hasn’t been available at home for nearly 50 years, read on to see which Shakespeare film adaptations have made the cut. chopped off.

You might also like: Can you answer those real “Jeopardy!” questions about the movies?

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25 of Shakespeare’s best film adaptations | Entertainment News https://taking-sides.com/25-of-shakespeares-best-film-adaptations-entertainment-news/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/25-of-shakespeares-best-film-adaptations-entertainment-news/ Shakespeare is widely recognized as one of the greatest English-language writers of all time. His beautiful language, portrayals of human nature, and mastery of writing dirty jokes have earned him an iconic place in the literary canon. So it seems a natural consequence that artists want to translate Shakespeare’s works into other mediums, including artwork, […]]]>

Shakespeare is widely recognized as one of the greatest English-language writers of all time. His beautiful language, portrayals of human nature, and mastery of writing dirty jokes have earned him an iconic place in the literary canon. So it seems a natural consequence that artists want to translate Shakespeare’s works into other mediums, including artwork, novelizations, and a seemingly endless number of screen adaptations.

But which of these adaptations is most successful in bringing Shakespeare’s genius to a wider audience? How do the films compare to the original texts by the bard themselves? In honor of the anniversary of Shakespeare’s death on April 23, 1616, Stacker sought to answer these questions by compiling the 25 best film adaptations of Shakespeare. The films were taken from Shakespeare’s writing credits on IMDb, filtered only into feature film adaptations (no filmed stage productions). Films had to have at least 1,000 votes and an IMDb user rating of 7.0 to be considered. Data is updated in April 2022.

From a contemporary adaptation that earned Denzel Washington an Oscar nomination to a ’60s image that hasn’t been available at home for nearly 50 years, read on to see which Shakespeare film adaptations have made the cut. chopped off.

You might also like: Can you answer those real “Jeopardy!” questions about the movies?

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The 5 best film adaptations of Shakespeare https://taking-sides.com/the-5-best-film-adaptations-of-shakespeare/ Sat, 02 Apr 2022 13:00:35 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/the-5-best-film-adaptations-of-shakespeare/ William Shakespeare remains one of the most famous writers in the world. His works are studied around the world and it is no surprise that his stories have affected many other artists who use his masterpieces as inspiration for their own creations. Shakespeare’s works were told and adapted in obvious and subtle ways. Below is […]]]>

William Shakespeare remains one of the most famous writers in the world. His works are studied around the world and it is no surprise that his stories have affected many other artists who use his masterpieces as inspiration for their own creations. Shakespeare’s works were told and adapted in obvious and subtle ways. Below is a ranking of five contemporary Shakespearean tales that fit the plots into modern settings and demonstrate creativity, entertainment, and reverence for Shakespeare’s brilliant storytelling.

5. “O” (2001) based on “Othello”

2001’s “O” tells the story of black student-athlete Odin, played by Mekhi Phifer, who shines as the MVP of his basketball team and has a beautiful and popular girlfriend named Desi, played by Julia Stiles. O’s coach (played by Martin Sheen) and his teammates adore him, with one exception: Hugo, played by Josh Hartnett, who is the basketball coach’s son and a teammate of Odin. Hugo resents Odin’s acclaim and strives to destroy him through manipulation. To achieve his ends, Hugo befriends Odin and feeds him lies about Desi cheating on him. Hugo fosters mistrust between Odin and everyone in his life, ultimately leading to his downfall. In this way and countless others, “O” mirrors the plot of Shakespeare’s “Othello”.

The film features classic “Othello” themes, such as jealousy and passion, all set against a contemporary high school setting. The film also features inclusive themes of race and adversity, making for an intense, fresh, and original narrative.

4. “Get Over It” (2001) based on “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

Another teen romance from 2001, this film adapts “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” into the context of a high school play; the students recreate a musical production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, the plot of which is reflected in the actions of the student actors. High schooler Berke, played by Ben Foster, tries to win back his ex-girlfriend, played by Melissa Sagemiller. In the process, he falls in love with Kirsten Dunst’s character, Kelly, in classic romantic comedy style. The film also stars famous actors from the early 2000s, Mila Kunis and Shane West.

As the film departs from the original plot of the play to allow for contemporary updates, the blending of the rough skeleton of the story arc and on-stage scenes creates clear parallels between the film and Shakespeare’s comedy. .

3. “She’s the Man” (2006) based on “Twelfth Night”

In third place comes “She’s the Man,” a popular comedy and modern take on “Twelfth Night.” Amanda Bynes stars as a soccer player named Viola, who takes on the identity of her brother, Sebastian, and attends a boarding school where she can play soccer as a boy after her school scraps the girls’ team . The play “Twelfth Night” features twins separated in a shipwreck, while in this film, Sebastian and Viola are separated in two different schools. Viola falls in love with her roommate and team captain, Duke, played by Channing Tatum, who doesn’t know her true identity, much like in the play.

“She’s the Man” incorporates comedy and a modern setting to effectively tell the same story while entertaining the audience. It also features a now-iconic pop culture moment, where Duke surprises Viola as “Sebastian” with a tampon, who pretends it’s for a nosebleed and inserts it into her nose.

2. “The Lion King” (1994) based on “Hamlet”

A beloved Disney classic, ‘The Lion King’ has become a favorite with children and adults across the world – but few people know it’s a contemporary tale by Shakespeare. In the cartoon “The Lion King”, Matthew Broderick voices the lion prince Simba. His father and King Mufasa, voiced by James Earl Jones, is killed by his brother Scar, played by Jeremy Irons. Although the story makes for a great Disney movie, it borrows much of the main plot from Shakespeare’s “Hamlet.”

Audiences can see the story of a king murdered by his brother and a young prince who sets out to avenge his father. In “The Lion King”, the lionesses become Scar’s servants, while in Hamlet the queen is forced to marry the traitorous uncle. Simba’s friends Timon and Pumba are apparent iterations of Hamlet’s friends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Overall, “The Lion King” remains one of Shakespeare’s strongest tales as it presents the main plot of the original story in a completely new light and reaches a wide range of audiences.

1. “10 Things I Hate About You” (1999) based on “The Taming of the Shrew”

The beloved 1999 teen romantic comedy “10 Things I Hate About You” takes the top spot as the best Shakespeare adaptation set in modern times. It closely follows the trajectory of “The Taming of the Shrew,” telling the story of Padua high school students and sisters Kat (Julia Stiles) and Bianca Stratford (Larisa Oleynik), whose father won’t let Bianca out until Kat does. To circumvent this restriction, Bianca’s aspiring suitor, lovesick Cameron (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) convinces self-absorbed pretty boy Joey (Andrew Keegan) to pay off the school’s mysterious rebel named Patrick (Heath Ledger) to “tame” Kat.

Many characters even share a similar name to their Shakespearean counterpart. For example, Bianca is Bianca, Kat is Katherina, and Patrick is Petruchio. The film also features various references to the play and to Shakespeare himself. In the film, Kat is referred to as “the shrew” during one of the early scenes, and Kat’s best friend is obsessed with Shakespeare and even has a picture of him in her locker. He can also be heard quoting him more than once throughout the film.

With the various references to the original play and the fidelity to the original mixed with modern fun, “10 Things I Hate About You” remains an example of a near-perfect Shakespeare retelling; it does justice to the original while delighting audiences with its quirky charm.

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Big Oscar wins for book-movie adaptations https://taking-sides.com/big-oscar-wins-for-book-movie-adaptations/ Thu, 31 Mar 2022 22:31:26 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/big-oscar-wins-for-book-movie-adaptations/ The Oscars wouldn’t be where it is today without some iconic book-to-movie adaptations. Here’s the best of 2022. The Oscars may have been overshadowed by Will Smith’s overzealous need to uphold his wife’s honor (did Chris Rock deserve it? I’ll let you decide). Apart this drama, the night had a lot to celebrate, especially in […]]]>

The Oscars wouldn’t be where it is today without some iconic book-to-movie adaptations. Here’s the best of 2022.

The Oscars may have been overshadowed by Will Smith’s overzealous need to uphold his wife’s honor (did Chris Rock deserve it? I’ll let you decide). Apart this drama, the night had a lot to celebrate, especially in the world of book-to-movie adaptations.

Novels have always been prime ground for Hollywood remakes – if you already have a good thread, the script writes itself, right? While we know that assumption is demonstrably wrong, this year’s Oscars had a handful of new adaptations that are sure to become classic movies.

The power of the dog

The big winner of the evening was Jane Campion, who won Best Director for the Power of the dog. Based on Thomas Savage’s novel of the same name, the film examines what it’s like to be a man, from the perspective of a homophobic, but closeted rancher. The power of the dog is a visceral, complex, and deeply satisfying read – relevant today as it was when it was written in 1967.

The power of the dog

Dunes

Directed by Denis Villeneuve, Dunes (adapted from Frank Herbert’s original) won six Oscars, winning in categories for cinematography, editing, music, visual effects, production design and sound. Part two isn’t due out until October 20, 2023, so you still have time up your sleeves to read it before it hits the big screens. Dunes is considered one of the greatest science fiction novels of all time.

Dunes

Drive my car (men without women)

drive my car, directed by Ryûsuke Hamaguchi, won the Oscar for best international feature film. Based on a short story from Haruki Murakami’s bestselling collection men without womenthe story centers on a widowed actor who hires a twenty-year-old woman as his driver. drive my car is a meditative exploration of the human need for connection and our inherent desire to be understood – even if we don’t realize it.

men without women

alley of nightmares

Alley of Nightmares — directed by Guillermo del Toro and based on William Lindsay Gresham’s 1946 novel of the same name – was nominated for four awards. alley of nightmares is a classic tale that follows a con man working in the world of vaudeville and magic. His journey sometimes engages with the metaphysical and the dangerous.

alley of nightmares

The lost girl

Maggie Gyllenhaal has been nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay of Elena Ferrante’s Novel The lost girl. Ferrante explores what it means to be a mother and a wife, and brings a thoughtful and fresh look at the conflicting emotions that connect us and our children.

The lost girl

For all the details, go to the official Oscars website.

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The best and worst book-movie adaptations https://taking-sides.com/the-best-and-worst-book-movie-adaptations/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 02:21:10 +0000 https://taking-sides.com/the-best-and-worst-book-movie-adaptations/ Best adaptation—Gatsby the magnificent (2013)Serena Uribe “A little party never killed nobody”, sings Fergie in a song from one of the best book-movie adaptations. I know a lot of people might disagree, but in my opinion, Baz Luhrmannthe 2013 interpretation of Gatsby the magnificent is the best version. Featuring a stellar cast of Leonardo DiCaprio, […]]]>

Best adaptation—Gatsby the magnificent (2013)
Serena Uribe

“A little party never killed nobody”, sings Fergie in a song from one of the best book-movie adaptations.

I know a lot of people might disagree, but in my opinion, Baz Luhrmannthe 2013 interpretation of Gatsby the magnificent is the best version. Featuring a stellar cast of Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire, Carey Mulligan, and Joel Edgerton, the Gatsby the magnificent reworks the 1925 novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald through a blazing and vivid lens.

The adaptation follows the novel’s original storyline and barely misses a beat. Although the book has been adapted four times, it is Luhrmann’s unique style of cinematography and directing that attracts viewers. Unlike its moderate counterparts, Luhrmann’s version is fast, colorful and glamorous. The deliberate choice of this style of living film evokes the splendor and decadence of the Roaring Twenties and the art-deco style. The parties, drama, mystery, and cinematography of the movie leave you in awe, and of course, everyone loves a good romance story.

Featuring a contemporary soundtrack that’s also part of the overall plot, the adaptation takes a modernized spin. Songs of Jay Z and Lana Del Ray are integrated into party scenes or dramatic encounters. This addition of contemporary music contributes to the liveliness of the film and reinforces the desired effect of visual excess and grandeur.

Good storytelling and inner dialogue are always appreciated, and like the novel, the film uses first-person narration by the protagonist, Nick Carraway (played by Maguire). The speed and moments with which Nick recounts the events of his summer of 1922 magnify the drama while inviting us into his psychic space.

The actors’ performances are also commendable, as they truly maximize the potential of their roles. No actor pulls his character down. Gatsby the magnificentit is the already tangled plot breeds plenty of intrigue, making it an ideal novel to write for the big screen. Luhrmann’s adaptation elevates every aspect of the plot and leaves no room for boredom. Although the film has been criticized for its excessive exaggeration, I think it livens up and enhances the storyline. After all, a little party never killed anyone, right?

Worst adaptation—The Mortal Instruments: City of Darkness (2013)
Dagale Mohammed

Would you like to learn a not so fun fact? The Mortal Instruments series by Claire Cassandra is based on Harry Potter fanfiction that Clare wrote herself, which got her banned from fanfiction.net. I don’t know about you, but I’ve read terrible fanfiction and I’ve never heard of a fanfiction writer being kicked out of fanfiction.net. Clare’s first foray into original writing is The city of bones, the first book in the series, which has been adapted into The Mortal Instruments: City of Darkness film, a boring mess.

In the story, Clary Fray (played by not-enough-redhead- Lily Collins in the film) spends an evening in New York with his best friend who is absolutely not in love with her, Simon (Robert Sheehan). They head to Club Pandemonium where Clary witnesses a murder. What is strange is that there is no one and no one else can see the murderer but her. Clary is then dragged further into the magical world of Shadowhunters by bad boy Jace Wayland (Jaime Campbell Bower). The plot has all the fixings of your ordinary YA fantasy adventure: Angels! Demons! Vampires! Maybe incest!

It’s a fun, flawed adventure into the magical underworld of New York City. The author includes a lot in this novel, from random side quests to a lot – and I mean a lot – of lore. This, however, can be forgiven because the book is engaging. Former student of the YA wave of the late 2000s, city ​​of bones remains one of the most memorable reads. However, the film’s dialogue is clunky, especially when world-building. Worse still, Clary feels like a spectator in a story where she is the main character. In Harry Potter, there’s no denying that Harry is average, but he still actively participates in the story, making decisions that move the plot forward. Likewise, Clary’s character drives the book’s plot, but she does not in the film; it takes a back seat because of the mediocre dialogue, decent computer-generated imagery, and weird plot. This adaptation was poorly done, and it’s no surprise that the sequel was canceled. If the plot appeals to you, just read the book.


Editor-in-Chief (Volume 48) — Serena is a third-year art history and professional writing and communication student at UTM. As a designer, she has always enjoyed watching and creating art and writing poetry. If she’s not typing at her desk, you can find her in an art gallery or museum, working out, dancing to her heart’s content, or cooking.

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